News

Grove Hotel Redevelopment

Posted by on 2014 in News | 0 comments

(Picture courtesy of Andrew Theen/The Oregonian) The Portland Development Commission has selected Naito Development, Eagle Point Hotel Partners, and Filament Hospitality to renovate the historic Grove Hotel, in downtown Portland, Oregon. Naito Development is grateful for the opportunity, and excited to begin work on this exceptional hospitality project. Read more here....

read more

Richland Boutique Hotel

Posted by on 2014 in News | 0 comments

April, 1 2014 Naito Development and Escape Lodging have entered into exclusive negotiations with the City of Richland, Washington to build an upscale, waterfront boutique hotel at Columbia Point. Read more here

read more

A private lift for public spaces

Posted by on 2012 in News | 0 comments

via oregonlive.com Published: Thursday, August 09, 2012, 5:59 PM     Updated: Thursday, August 09, 2012, 11:06 PM  By The Oregonian Editorial Board  As anyone who has been to the Keller Auditorium in downtown Portland knows, the boxy building may bore but the fountains across the street rock. Sheets of water roll off cascading concrete blocks into a pool at the base, as if the hard surfaces played to some ancient rhythm and as if the natural world itself had crept in to disrupt urban order. Care for a dip, anyone? Yes: twice. That’s what the late landscape architect Lawrence Halprin had in mind in designing the Forecourt Fountains, now known as the Ira Keller Fountain for the man who championed Halprin’s work and who dared his own Portland Development Commission to stretch its imagination in the urban renewal-crazy 1960s. But time, depleted city budgets, shifting development priorities and a new generation of Portlanders unaware of Halprin’s work have taken a hard toll. The Keller Fountain, despite an overhaul in the 1990s, suffers for proper maintenance. Less visible are Halprin’s precursor spaces to the Keller Fountain — the Source Fountain, Lovejoy Fountain and Pettygrove Park. All are situated nearby, walkable to the south along Southwest Third and Second avenues. And they, especially, have fallen into disrepair. Yet together the four Halprin installations form an uncommon sequence: urban spaces informed by nature — as if they were their own watershed — and one in their attempt to engage people in play and contemplation. On a good day, the Halprin parks still succeed on those counts. And while they look a bit frayed, they are credited internationally with changing the conception of what’s architecturally possible in cities. But fame, perhaps more so when it’s elsewhere, never paid bills. And upkeep for the parks stymies three cash-short city bureaus — parks, transportation and water. That’s where several Portlanders have stepped up to make the difference. Among them are developer John Russell, whose building at 200 Market St. is situated next door to Pettygrove Park; developer Bob Naito; and The Oregonian’s former architecture critic, Randy Gragg. All worry about not only the condition of the parks but the values of surrounding properties. Gragg years ago spearheaded the formation of the nonprofit Lawrence Halprin Landscape Conservancy, whose sole purpose was and is to find the money to fix and maintain the parks. The thinking is plain though nobody quite says it: If Rome assures that the Trevi Fountain and Piazza Navona endure, then why can’t Portland find a way to safeguard its best publicly shared treasures? The conservancy has logged nearly $2 million in needed repairs at the four sites. Russell has pledged $200,000 and already engaged in tree-pruning and lawn-rebuilding. Others, among them Greg Goodman, are contributors. The city’s recent clearance to the conservancy — that it provide the added layer of maintenance it cannot — clears the way for things to really start happening. But the let’s-just-get-it-done ethic is no stranger here. Years ago the Pittock Mansion, in its perch overlooking the city, was at risk. The city bought the property in a spasm to save it. But it took private citizens who formed a nonprofit corporation to raise money for the Pittock’s overhaul, upkeep and management. That’s why the mansion is such a tidy, flourishing place today —...

read more

Portland nonprofit pays for private contractors to refresh historic parks

Posted by on 2012 in News | 0 comments

via oregonlive.com Published: Monday, August 06, 2012, 5:44 PM     Updated: Monday, August 06, 2012, 6:37 PM The grass at downtown Portland’s Pettygrove Park is green for the first time in years thanks to an unusual partnership. After years of lobbying, a group of developers persuaded the Portland City Council to let their nonprofit tend to a string of park spaces created by the late renowned architect Lawrence Halprin: Pettygrove, Keller Fountain Park and Lovejoy Fountain Park, plus Source Fountain. Normally, city-employed union workers must do parks maintenance. But the developers — John Russell and Bob Naito among them — argued that the Halprin parks are works of art in need of specialized care that regular maintenance workers can’t provide. The City Council finally agreed, signing a contract with the nonprofit Halprin Landscape Conservancy last year. Now Russell and the conservancy, in addition to working to revive public interest in the Halprin parks, can raise money and hire outside contractors to help maintain the parks. Work got under way at Pettygrove a few weeks ago and will begin at Lovejoy Fountain Park next spring. In coming years, the conservancy plans to establish an endowment to take care of the sites. It has raised $200,000 so far. The group’s contract with the city runs indefinitely, but city officials can cancel it any time. Last spring, the conservancy drew up detailed plans for $1.5 million to $2 million in repairs at the four sites. Repairs — ranked from urgent to low priority — include everything from fixing cracked concrete to replacing lighting. “We’ll help to maintain them above and beyond what the city is able to provide,” said Marcy McInelly, the conservancy’s chairwoman. “These parks are a modernist legacy.” The parks, plazas and fountains span eight blocks of downtown and are connected by shaded promenades. They are quiet yet urban, similar to Halprin’s other work, including the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C. Not everyone likes the agreement to fix the parks. Richard Beetle, business manager of Laborers Local 483, which represents parks maintenance workers, filed an unsuccessful grievance over a 2009 deal that allowed Russell to hire outside contractors to prune trees at Pettygrove Park. He recently filed a grievance protesting the new outside hiring at Pettygrove, too. “That’s our work,” he said. But city Commissioner Nick Fish, who oversees the Portland Parks Bureau, said union work isn’t being taken away. Given his bureau’s shrinking budget, he said, the work at Pettygrove, Keller Fountain and the other sites wouldn’t happen without the conservancy. He added that such partnerships are part of a national trend. “We could not maintain the gold-medal system we do without these private-public partnerships,” Fish said. “We just haven’t had the money to make the investment of maintenance we wanted to” for the Halprin parks. Portland parks receive volunteer hours and money from about 120 friend and nonprofit groups. The Halprin Landscape Conservancy, though, is among the few groups authorized to draw up plans and pay for its own contractors semi-independently. The Portland Japanese Garden and Pioneer Courthouse Square are maintained under a similar structure. Reaching agreement wasn’t easy, though. Russell said it took him 18 months to persuade the city to let him bring in workers to prune the trees at Pettygrove, which is next to his 200 Market St. building. He sees maintaining the Halprin parks, built in the 1960s and early ’70s,...

read more